Grotto joins projects and investigations team at Bloomberg News

Jason GrottoProPublica Illinois reporter Jason Grotto has joined Bloomberg News on its projects and investigations team.His first day was Monday.Previously, he worked as an investigative reporter for the Chicago Tribune and the Miami Herald. His project exposing widespread inaccuracies and disparities in Cook County’s property tax assessment system was a Pulitzer Prize finalist for local reporting and received the Gerald Loeb Award for local reporting in 2018.He has also reported on the pension crisis in Chicago and Illinois and led another Gerald Loeb Award-winning investigation on Chicago Public Schools’ disastrous use of auction-rate securities. He has uncovered fraud in federal poverty programs, problems…

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Crain’s New York hires Everett as reporter

Gwen EverettCrain’s New York Business has hired Gwen Everett as a reporter.She started on Monday.Everett previously worked as a reporter for Business Insider and interned on the finance team at Bloomberg News in New York.She is a graduate of Brown University where she covered higher education for the Daily Herald.

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Maggs, editor at Bloomberg Businessweek, dies at 55

Barry MaggsBarry Maggs, an editor who had worked at Bloomberg Businessweek magazine for the past 22 years, died Saturday at the age of 55 from cancer.Maggs joined Businessweek in 1998 when it was still owned by McGraw-Hill.He edited columns by Jack and Suzy Welch, Charlie Rose, and numerous outside columnists. He was known on the desk as the CEO whisperer, someone who could gently convince the heartiest of egos to change their prose to make a more compelling argument.Before Businessweek, Maggs worked at HK Magazine as managing editor for two years and associate editor of Asia Inc. magazine for two…

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Harding is departing The Markup

Xavier HardingXavier Harding, a reporter at new technology site The Markup, is leaving to work for Mozilla.At Mozilla, he will write about their initiatives surrounding user privacy, ethical AI, misinformation on the web and more.“I can’t stress enough how much I’ll miss the Markup folks,” he wrote on Twitter.After graduating from Gettysburg College, Harding worked at International Business Times/Newsweek as a tech and gaming reporter. From there he went onto Popular Science. As tech editor of Popular Science’s Now section, he continued to write about gadgets and the companies that make them, both in print and on the web.He then…

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Nissan invests £52m in Sunderland plant to build new Qashqai

More than £50m has been invested in the Nissan plant in Sunderland as the firm gears up to build the new Qashqai. The Japanese car-manufacturer said its new press, which weighs over 2,000 tonnes and can exert a pressure of 5,000 tonnes, forms part of its £400m investment in the plant. The Qashqai, which came out in 2006, is the plant’s most successful car. Nissan had previously said that a no-deal Brexit could make its European business model “unsustainable”. The press took 18 months to install. Nissan’s chief operating officer Ashwani Gupta, said: “When the first Nissan Qashqai rolled off…

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NPR reporter Allyn moving to San Fran to cover tech

Bobby AllynBobby Allyn, a general assignment reporter for NPR in Washington, is moving to San Francisco next month to cover technology and Silicon Valley.He came to Washington from Philadelphia, where he covered criminal justice and breaking news for more than four years at member station WHYY. In that role, he focused on major corruption trials, law enforcement, and local criminal justice policy.He helped lead NPR’s reporting of Bill Cosby’s two criminal trials. He was a guest on Fresh Air after breaking a major story about the nation’s first supervised injection site plan in Philadelphia. In between daily stories, he has worked on several investigative projects,…

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Flybe’s collapse could be ‘first of many’ airlines

The failure of Europe’s biggest regional airline Flybe could be the start of more casualties, analysts predict. On Thursday, a global airline industry body warned the financial hit from coronavirus could reach $113bn (£87bn) this year. The bleak prediction came on the same day UK-based Flybe went into administration. Airline experts are forecasting more failures as passengers cancel flights. Flybe’s collapse “will likely be the first of many in 2020,” said James Goodall, transport analyst at Redburn. “We expect that the demand destruction caused by Covid-19 accelerated its demise and we believe further airline bankruptcies should be expected in the…

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Babad, longtime Canadian biz journalist, dies at 66

Michael BabadMichael Babad, a longtime Canadian business journalist who was at The Globe and Mail in Toronto, died Thursday at 66 from cancer.Andrew WIllis of The Globe and Mail writes, “For much of his career, Mr. Babad was part of a team that ran business coverage at major Canadian media outlets and helped chronicle the corporate agenda. As a Toronto-based wire-service writer and editor at UPI, his articles appeared around the world. A graduate of Ryerson University’s journalism program, Mr. Babad started his career at the Oshawa Times in 1977. He was editor of The Globe’s Report on Business section for…

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Flybe goes into administration after outbreak struggle

Flybe has gone into administration after struggling to raise funds amid a steep fall in bookings due to coronavirus. One of Britain’s largest airlines, Flybe entered administration just after 3am on Thursday, with all flights grounded and the business having ceased trading “with immediate effect”. It prompted pilots’ union Balpa to accuse the government and the airline’s owners of “betrayal and broken promises” – and questions about how vital regional transport links will be maintained. The GMB union warned that, in addition to Flybe’s 2,400 staff, the collapse threatened 1,400 jobs in the supply chain and put the future of…

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Work remains on International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day on Sunday March 8 is a time to celebrate women’s achievements. It’s also a time for courageous conversations about how we can better support women at work and in society. Leading those conversations are some of Western Australia’s business, education and indigenous leaders, who reflect on International Women’s Day and what it means for the state. Leaders’ views The University of Western Australia’s vice-chancellor elect, Amit Chakma, sees International Women’s Day as a day of celebration and reflection, a day “When I take stock of what has been accomplished and what still needs to be done”. Fortescue…

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Seattle Times wins Scripps Howard award for business/financial reporting

The Seattle Times has won the William Brewster Styles award for business and financial reporting in the Scripps Howard Awards.The Times won for its coverage of the Boeing 737 MAX crisis led by reporter Dominic Gates.Judges applauded the series, saying it “deftly explores the issue of who is to blame and why those who could have stopped this from happening did not act.”Other finalists in the category were ProPublica for “The TurboTax Trap” and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel for “Turned Away.”The Scripps Howard Awards are one of the nation’s most prestigious American journalism competitions, offering $170,000 in prize money in…

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Bond fans ask for No Time to Die delay due to coronavirus

The founders of two of the most popular James Bond fan sites are asking the studios behind the next Bond film to delay its release due to coronovirus. No Time to Die is due for release on 3 April but fans have asked for it to be held back to the summer “when experts expect the epidemic to have peaked”. The open letter is from the founders of MI6 Confidential and The James Bond Dossier, James Page and David Leigh. “It is time to put public health above marketing release schedules.” The letter, titled No Time for Indecision, continued: “With…

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Examining the culture within Bloomberg News

Al HuntNicole Einbinder and Dakin Campbell of Business Insider write about the culture within the Bloomberg News editorial operations.Einbinder and Campbell write, “Few names came up in Business Insider’s conversations with employees more than Al Hunt, Bloomberg News’ former Washington editor and one of the organization’s most visible faces in politics until his 2018 exit. Hunt’s behavior was at issue in numerous human resources complaints and at least two financial settlements, according to people with knowledge of the complaints and settlements.“Hunt joined Bloomberg in 2005, while Mike Bloomberg was New York City mayor, after nearly four decades as a reporter…

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Wichita Biz Journal editor Roy discloses ALS diagnosis

Bill RoyBill Roy, the editor of the Wichita Business Journal, disclosed to his readers that he has been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease.Roy writes, “Which is ironic, since I was not a great baseball player.“I do, however, consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth, to steal Gehrig’s words, because of the love and support shared with me since I was diagnosed in October.Read more here.

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CoStar Group hires Burke to cover San Fran real estate

Katie BurkeSan Francisco Business Times real estate reporter Katie Burke has been hired by CoStar Group to cover real estate in the Bay area.At the Business Times, she covered the hospitality/food and beverage/retail beat.Burke, a Bay Area native, had worked as a reporter intern for the Times, and spent more than two years as the commercial and residential real estate, retail and legal reporter for the San Antonio Business Journal.She has been at the Business Times since June 2017.Burke has also written for Crittenden Research in Novato, California, and graduated from the University of Washington in 2012 with degrees in journalism and art history.

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